The Interaction Between Order of Elicitation and Event Controllability on the Self-Positivity Bias

Chien-Huang Lin, National Central University
Ying-Ching Lin, National Chi Nan University
Priya Raghubir, University of California at Berkeley
ABSTRACT - This paper studies the underlying reason behind the self-positivity bias. As events perceived to be controllable implicate self-esteem more so than less controllable ones, they are more prone to self-positivity effects. On the other hand, as less controllable events do not implicate self-esteem, only when the order-of-elicitation cues comparative (versus absolute) judgments about the self, does the self-positivity effect emerge. When information about Aself@ is asked first, the bias is attenuated, but when others’ estimates are elicited prior to self-estimates, the bias re-emerges even for uncontrollable events. Implications for health marketing are offered.
[ to cite ]:
Chien-Huang Lin, Ying-Ching Lin, and Priya Raghubir (2004) ,"The Interaction Between Order of Elicitation and Event Controllability on the Self-Positivity Bias", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 31, eds. Barbara E. Kahn and Mary Frances Luce, Valdosta, GA : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 523-529.