Measuring Implicit Self-Concept Domains With the Implicit Association Test

Andrew Perkins, University of Washington
Mark R. Forehand, University of Washington
ABSTRACT - Three experiments are presented that explore the existence and characteristics of distinct actual and ideal self-domains within the implicit self-concept. In each experiment, undergraduate participants completed idiographic implicit association tests (IATs) that measured strength of association between self-reported domain-specific attributes and various elements of the self-concept. Supporting the existence of distinct implicit self-domains, participants more strongly associated positive concepts (experiment 1) and self-related pronouns (experiment 2) with ideal self-attributes than with actual-self attributes. Experiment 3 revealed that these domain-specific associations are driven by the semantic meanings of the attributes and not just the perceived valence of the attributes.
[ to cite ]:
Andrew Perkins and Mark R. Forehand (2003) ,"Measuring Implicit Self-Concept Domains With the Implicit Association Test", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 30, eds. Punam Anand Keller and Dennis W. Rook, Valdosta, GA : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 349.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 30, 2003     Page 349

MEASURING IMPLICIT SELF-CONCEPT DOMAINS WITH THE IMPLICIT ASSOCIATION TEST

Andrew Perkins, University of Washington

Mark R. Forehand, University of Washington

ABSTRACT -

Three experiments are presented that explore the existence and characteristics of distinct actual and ideal self-domains within the implicit self-concept. In each experiment, undergraduate participants completed idiographic implicit association tests (IATs) that measured strength of association between self-reported domain-specific attributes and various elements of the self-concept. Supporting the existence of distinct implicit self-domains, participants more strongly associated positive concepts (experiment 1) and self-related pronouns (experiment 2) with ideal self-attributes than with actual-self attributes. Experiment 3 revealed that these domain-specific associations are driven by the semantic meanings of the attributes and not just the perceived valence of the attributes.

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