Pleasures of Different Intensity Levels: Properties of Their Online Hedonic Ratings and Their Impact on Consumption Behavior

Jordan L. Le Bel, Concordia University
Laurette Dube, McGill University
ABSTRACT - The study reported in this paper focused on sensory pleasures of different intensity at the onset of a consumption episode. The objective was to model the pattern of change, as the episode unfolded, in online hedonic ratings (pleasure and desire to consume next unit) and to study the relationship between initial pleasure intensity and amount consumed. Twenty-two adults (14 women, 8 men) participated and consumed three different flavors of dark chocolate selected on an idiosyncratic basis to induce sensory pleasures of a broad range of intensity. The three chocolates were consumed in three separate test sessions following an identical procedure. Results suggest two important properties of online hedonic ratings: (1) moment-to-moment pattern of change reflects a Markov property, (2) increases in initial pleasure intensity are associated with diminishing marginal hedonic responses overall (observed for both pleasure and desire). Initial pleasure intensity was positively related to the amount consumed, but not by as large a quantity as might be expected. Theoretical and managerial implications are discussed.
[ to cite ]:
Jordan L. Le Bel and Laurette Dube (2001) ,"Pleasures of Different Intensity Levels: Properties of Their Online Hedonic Ratings and Their Impact on Consumption Behavior", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28, eds. Mary C. Gilly and Joan Meyers-Levy, Valdosta, GA : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 411.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28, 2001     Page 411

PLEASURES OF DIFFERENT INTENSITY LEVELS: PROPERTIES OF THEIR ONLINE HEDONIC RATINGS AND THEIR IMPACT ON CONSUMPTION BEHAVIOR

Jordan L. Le Bel, Concordia University

Laurette Dube, McGill University

ABSTRACT -

The study reported in this paper focused on sensory pleasures of different intensity at the onset of a consumption episode. The objective was to model the pattern of change, as the episode unfolded, in online hedonic ratings (pleasure and desire to consume next unit) and to study the relationship between initial pleasure intensity and amount consumed. Twenty-two adults (14 women, 8 men) participated and consumed three different flavors of dark chocolate selected on an idiosyncratic basis to induce sensory pleasures of a broad range of intensity. The three chocolates were consumed in three separate test sessions following an identical procedure. Results suggest two important properties of online hedonic ratings: (1) moment-to-moment pattern of change reflects a Markov property, (2) increases in initial pleasure intensity are associated with diminishing marginal hedonic responses overall (observed for both pleasure and desire). Initial pleasure intensity was positively related to the amount consumed, but not by as large a quantity as might be expected. Theoretical and managerial implications are discussed.

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