Toward Understanding Individual Differences in Web Usage: the Case For Timestyle

Lisa Ricci, University of Connecticut
June Cotte, University of South Carolina
ABSTRACT - Recent research on Web usage experiences and behaviors has stressed the role of constructs such as flow, telepresence, and time distortion. Yet, little research has been done to examine the locus of individual differences in how consumers experience the Web. Neither has much research been done on the role of specific individual-difference variables in how consumers behave online and the underlying motives that drive these behaviors. We focus here on the role of individual differences in timestyle. Specifically, we investigate how the social, planning, and polychronic dimensions of timestyle influence several facets of Web usage experiences, behaviors, and motives. We distinguish between utilitarian and hedonic motives for Web usage and suggest how the various dimensions of timestyle are likely to impact differentially on these motives. We also postulate that the three timestyle dimensions are likely to influence the frequency of exploratory behavior, information search behavior, entertainment behavior, and electronic shopping behavior on the Web, with the two types of motives acting as mediating variables. We examine these predictions with data from a survey of 216 respondents and conclude with a discussion of the implications of our research for the practice of interactive marketing.
[ to cite ]:
Lisa Ricci and June Cotte (2001) ,"Toward Understanding Individual Differences in Web Usage: the Case For Timestyle", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28, eds. Mary C. Gilly and Joan Meyers-Levy, Valdosta, GA : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 41.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28, 2001     Page 41

TOWARD UNDERSTANDING INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN WEB USAGE: THE CASE FOR TIMESTYLE

Lisa Ricci, University of Connecticut

June Cotte, University of South Carolina

ABSTRACT -

Recent research on Web usage experiences and behaviors has stressed the role of constructs such as flow, telepresence, and time distortion. Yet, little research has been done to examine the locus of individual differences in how consumers experience the Web. Neither has much research been done on the role of specific individual-difference variables in how consumers behave online and the underlying motives that drive these behaviors. We focus here on the role of individual differences in timestyle. Specifically, we investigate how the social, planning, and polychronic dimensions of timestyle influence several facets of Web usage experiences, behaviors, and motives. We distinguish between utilitarian and hedonic motives for Web usage and suggest how the various dimensions of timestyle are likely to impact differentially on these motives. We also postulate that the three timestyle dimensions are likely to influence the frequency of exploratory behavior, information search behavior, entertainment behavior, and electronic shopping behavior on the Web, with the two types of motives acting as mediating variables. We examine these predictions with data from a survey of 216 respondents and conclude with a discussion of the implications of our research for the practice of interactive marketing.

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