Sessions 8.1 and 8.2 Poster Sessions

[ to cite ]:
(2000) ,"Sessions 8.1 and 8.2 Poster Sessions", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 27, eds. Stephen J. Hoch and Robert J. Meyer, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 244-250.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 27, 2000      Pages 244-250

SESSIONS 8.1 AND 8.2

POSTER SESSIONS

 

"THE ACCIDENTAL TOURIST: PATTERNS OF REGRET FOR SOUVENIRS PURCHASED OR LEFT BEHIND"

Lisa J. Abendroth, Boston University

Kristin R. Diehl, Duke University

Research suggests that purchases (actions) should be regretted more in the short-term and failures to purchase (inactions) should be regretted more in the long-term (Gilovich and Medvec, 1995). In this study, we found a reversal in this pattern of regrets among vacation travelers. This reversal is explained by the nature of the purchase decision, which represented a limited opportunity with no behavioral recourse (e.g. returns, exchanges, or delayed purchase).

 

"SUBTRACTIVE VERSUS ADDITIVE BRAND EXTENSIONS: USING COUNTERFACTUAL REASONING TO EXPLAIN EXTENSION PREFERENCE"

Debra Basil, University of Colorado

Counterfactual reasoning research suggests that subtractive counterfactual reasoning is perceived to differ less from reality than additive counterfactual reasoning. Applying this research to brand extensions, subtractive brand extensions should be seen as less different from the core brand than additive brand extensions. A subtractive brand extension is one that has fewer features than the core product and requires little or no new technology and/or materials to produce. An additive brand extension is one that has more features than the core product and requires additional technology and/or materials to produce. It is theorized here that since brand extensions that are more similar to the core brand are preferred, subtractive brand extensions should be preferred. Two laboratory studies were conducted. Results demonstrated that subtractive brand extensions were preferred to additive brand extensions. Results regarding the moderating effect of brand strength on these findings were inconclusive.

 

"PEOPLE’S COMPENSATORY BEHAVIORS: LOW FAT EATING, DIETING, AND EXERCISE"

Michael D. Basil, University of Denver

Edward Maibach, Porter, Novelli

Debra Z. Basil, University of Colorado

Do people compensate for an unhealthy behavior with a healthy one? Public health research finds that unhealthy behaviors cluster, and explains this through theories of addiction and drives. Consumer theories of decision-making focus on the cognitive activity around choice; for example, mental accounting suggests that people may actively account for their transgressions. A nationally representative sample of 2,498 people was surveyed about their health compensation behaviors.

The results show that 88% track their health compensation behaviors. Because women, people with more education, and the healthiest people engage in the most compensation, compensation appears is associated with increased health behaviors. Thus, compensation appears to be a skill that may help people manage their health and consumption behaviors.

 

"COLLEGE STUDENTS’ PERCEPTIONS OF RESPONSIBILITY FOR ALCOHOL-RELATED BEHAVIORS"

M. Elizabeth Blair, Ohio University

Eva M. Hyatt, Appalachian State University

In recent years, there has been a trend in the courts of holding manufacturers of guns and tobacco products responsible for deaths, injuries and illness caused by these two products. For example, relatives of victims in a 1993 San Francisco shooting spree filed a lawsuit against the gun manufacturer, Intratec Firearms. They alleged that the semi-automatic rifle was targeted toward criminals and was inappropriate for any other use, such as target shooting, hunting or self-protection. In the cigarette industry, the Master Settlement Agreement, reached in November 1998, agrees for the cigarette companies to pay $206 billion to 46 states over a twenty-five year period to compensate for medical costs.

Given these trends, alcohol manufacturers could be the next industry to be held liable for deaths, injuries and health-related costs. In this study, the authors investigate marketing students’ perception of whether or not the alcohol companies are responsible for students’ irresponsible drinking behavior. Preliminary surveys indicate that students overwhelmingly view themselves to be responsible for their own drinking behavior. Future research will focus on understanding students’ perceptions, and investigating any circumstances which might cause them to place blame on the company for accidents due to irresponsible drinking. These findings are expected to have relevance to programs for marketing responsible drinking behavior to college students, as well as implications for teaching them business ethics.

 

"OBITUARIES, ADVERTISING AND CONSUMER IDENTITIES: CONSUMER BEHAVIOR IN ASANTE DEATH RITUALS"

Samuel Kwaku Bonsu, University of Rhode Island

Jonathan E. Schroeder, University of Rhode Island

The primary objective of this project is to explore a unique form of advertisingBobituaries placed by bereaved families among the Asante people of Ghana, West Africa. The study adopts a text-interpretive method of analysis and suggests that obituaries are doctored representations of a person’s life for purposes of creating new and refined images of the dead, and for enhancing the social status of the living. Apart from addressing the paucity of consumer research in developing societies, this project’s focus on Asante death ritual consumption offers a unique window for examining ritual consumption and its relationship to consumer identity processes.

 

"DO FAMOUS FACES CAPTURE ATTENTION?"

Heather Buttle, University of Wales

Jane E. Raymond, University of Wales

Shai Danziger, University of Wales

Although many advertisements use famous faces, the effect of famous faces versus non-famous faces on perceptual and cognitive processes have been poorly studied. Using briefly presented images, this study examined whether famous faces were processed faster and captured attention more effectively than non-famous faces. The study employed a change detection procedure that required participants to locate faces that changed. The results indicate that detection of changes involving a famous face were significantly more accurate than those affecting non-famous faces. The study suggests a potential technique for quantifying how recognizable a particular face is for a given target audience.

 

"EVALUATING SYMBOLISM IN A CONSUMER PRODUCT: THE AFFINITY CREDIT CARD"

Richard M. Campbell, Jr., University of Oregon

Although the symbolic nature of products has long been discused in the marketing literature, there are few empirical studies examining symbolism in product and brand offerings. Keller (1993) and others have suggested considering the symbolic, functional, and experiential benefits of brands as a basis for analysis. The purpose of this paper is to examine consumers’ preferences for a product that is marketed based on its symbolic appealBaffinity credit cardsBto demonstrate that all three benefits are salient to consumers. The results of a conjoint study (N=39) suggest that the functional benefitBoperationalized as interest rateBis the most important determinant in selecting this product, which is marketed based on its symbolic benefit. Managerial implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

 

"THE EFFECTS OF VIEWER RESPONSES TO TELEVISION COMMERCIALS ON IMMEDIATE AND DELAYED AD ATTITUDE AND BRAND EVALUATION AMONG KOREAN CONSUMERS"

Hyongoh Cho, Dongguk University

Heejin Kim, Kyungwon University

 

"BRINGING BACK YOUR ONLINE CUSTOMERS: AN EXPLORATION OF THE ROLE OF ATMOSPHERICS ON THE WEB"

Lynn Dailey, University of Kentucky

Chip Heath, Duke University

The World Wide Web is quickly becoming a battleground for marketers. The increased importance of an online presence emphasizes the need for marketers to develop tools that will assist them in effectively marketing their products through the web. This paper empirically tests one portion of the Web Atmospheric Model that suggests the influence of pleasure and arousal on consumers’ browsing and revisiting intentions. The results of an online experiment suggest that atmospherics can be used to augment consumers’ intentions to browse and revisit web sites emphasizing the importance of atmospherics as a tool for marketers on the web.

 

"WHY ARE CONSUMERS VIEWED AS LIMITED INFORMATION PROCESSORS?"

Johan de Heer, Tilburg University

In the area of consumer behavior research, the consumer is paradigmatically viewed as a limited information processor. The theoretical ideas regarding processing limitations originate in the sixties in the field of auditory and visual perception attention research, where they were applied to the perceptual system. When, in the seventies, the theoretical ideas were transferred to the area of consumer behavior, they were applied to the cognitive system, however. More recently, several visual perception researchers started to question the existence of processing limitations. Possible implications for the area of consumer behavior research are discussed.

 

"A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK OF CHARITABLE GIFT GIVING"

Tanya Drollinger, Purdue University

Charitable giving has been largely ignored relative to other forms of gift giving in consumer behavior literature. The primary goal of this research was to develop a multi-disciplinary conceptual framework in which economic, sociological, and psychological theories were considered. The theories of permanent income hypothesis, symbolic interaction, and self-extension are essential when assessing the donor’s financial ability, present and past pro-social interactions, and ultimate decision to donate to a particular charitable organization. When examining the donation decision process from several disciplines it is clear that the seemingly inequitable exchange between a donor and a charitable organization can produce tangible and non-tangible rewards. Understanding the underlying motives and the decision process is requisite for the increasing number of non-profits who seek the support of private donors for their prosperity.

 

"WHY DOES NICOLE LOVE HER BABY BLANKET?"

Mohan Jyoti Dutta, University of Minnesota

Current work on symbolic consumption suggests that people develop relationships with the objects they use and consume. This paper attempts at providing an insight into the relationship development process by incorporating Murstein’s Stimulus-Values-Role Theory. It suggests a theoretical framework of categorizing products based on the different stages of the consumption cycle they belong to. The paper is based on depth interviews conducted with female undergraduate students at a mid-western university.

 

"PERSONALITY AND CONDOM PURCHASE"

Mohan Jyoti Dutta, University of Minnesota

Fang Wan, University of Minnesota

Kenneth O. Doyle, University of Minnesota

Tao Sun, University of Minnesota

Current research on condom usage clearly demonstrates a large need for appropriate market segmentation and message design techniques. This paper suggests the use of personality as a segmentation and targeting tool. Through an analysis of the 1995 Life Styles Survey conducted by DDB Needham, the paper proposes a simple personality framework for use by social marketers.

 

"VEGITARIANISM AND THE AMERICAN CONSUMER: THE POLITICS OF EATING"

Deborah J. Evers, University of Arkansas

Anne M. Velliquette, University of Arkansas

This article relates vegetarianism to marketing, consumer research, and public policy. First, working definitions of types of vegetarianism are developed and discussed. Second, the type of consumer that typically becomes a vegetarian is explored with special emphasis placed on issues related to gender, social class, ethnicity, and religion. Third, vegetarianism as a social movement is presented. This section develops the macro dimension of vegetarianism, suggesting that this individual choice also commits the consumer to a social vision. Fourth, three broad arguments for becoming a vegetarian are described. These arguments include health, animal rights/ethics, and the environment. Finally, future directions are considered which include longitudinal research and the linking of vegetarianism to identity politics.

 

"MUSIC AND IDENTITY: POPULAR CULTURE AND ITS IMPACT ON IDENTITY"

Dan Fisher, University of Arkansas

Jennifer Christie, University of Arkansas

 

"THE GLOBAL ECONOMIC ELITE CONSUMER: UPDATING MILLS’ POWER ELITE FROM A CONSUMPTION PERSPECTIVE"

Terrance G. Gabel, California State University, Northridge

Gregory W. Boller, University of Memphis

In The Power Elite, C. Wright Mills (1956) explores both the inner workings of elite circles and the manner in which the desires and behavior of these stealthily allied persons determine life as lived by the masses in post-WWII America. Academicians have expended at best little effort to modernize Mills’ conceptualization. This is particularly true in marketing and consumer research where objective examination of the activities of elite persons is virtually nonexistent. This inquiry historically and ethnographically updates Mills’ seminal conceptualization from a consumption perspective via development of the notion of the global economic elite consumer.

 

"PRIVATE LABEL ATTITUDE: RELATIONSHIPS WITH PRICE AND NON-PRICE LATENT CCNSTRUCTS"

Judith A. Garretson, University of Arkansas

Scot Burton, University of Arkansas

The growth of private label brands has continued to attract iterest among industry analysts and consumer researchers. However, few scholarly studies have addressed relationships between various latent constructs related to consumers’ private label attitudes and purchase behaviors. This paper proposes and tests a model of possible antecedents of private label attitude, examining the impact of consumer price perception measures, general consumer marketplace tendencies, and consumers’ attitudes toward promotional deals on a multi-item private label attitude measure. Results from this study indicate that both price-related and non-price-related latent constructs directly impact private label attitude, but the price-related latent constructs examined offer stronger predictions of attitude toward private labels. Implications of these findings for retailers and product marketers are discussed.

 

"SOME MAPPING ISSUES IN RESEARCHING VALUES FOR CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR"

Margaret K. Hogg, Manchester School of Management

The centrality of values and value systems to understanding consumer behaviour has been acknowledged in a series of studies. This theoretical paper explores some issues which surround the mapping of marker values on to motivational domains. The allocation of exemplary marker values from RVS and LOV onto Schwartz and Bilsky’s framework of motivational value domains is not entirely unproblematic; and raises important issues for the subsequent interpretation of results for consumer behaviour research in comparative and cross-cultural settings

 

"TWO DIMENSIONS OF COMPUTER AND INTERNET USE: A RELIABLE AND VALIDATED SCALE"

Eric J. Karson, Saint Joseph’s University

Hedonic and utilitarian motivations have emerged as important in the study of both consumer shopping behavior (Babin, Darden, and Griffin 1994, Batra and Ahtola 1991, and Crowley, Spangenberg, and Hughes 1992) and in understanding how people adapt to the usage of new information technology (Davis 1989). Given the increasing use of the Internet as a marketing channel, this research adapts a valid and reliable scale of using one specific computer program (Davis, Bagozzi, and Warshaw 1992), to the use of computers and the Internet in general. Results from a large study show that the adapted scales are both reliable and valid as measures of assessing the hedonic and utilitarian motivations for Internet and computer use.

 

"THE IMPACT OF CULTURAL DIFFERENCES ON THE PURCHASE DECISIONS AND PRE AND POST PURCHASE CONSIDERATIONS OF CONSUMERS:THE CULTURE-PURCHASE INTERACTION MATRIX"

Hande Kmloglu, Bogaziti University

This study is an attempt to explain the nature of the relationship between culture and consumers’ purchase considerations and decisions. In order to depict how cultural differences may affect the cognitions, attitudes, behaviors, and decisions of consumers, a culture-purchase interaction matrix has been created. In this matrix, seven dimensions of culture are handled in relationship with certain pre and post purchase considerations and purchase decisions of consumers. Four of these dimensions are taken from Hofstede’s well-known study about the subject. These are "individualism versus collectivism", "masculinity versus femininity", "uncertainty avoidance", and "power distance". A fifth dimension, "fatalistic views" or "future orientation" comes from House’s ongoing study. Finally, "degree of nationality" and "conservatism versus change" are the dimensions that have been contributed within the scope of this specific study.

These seven dimensions are the components of the independent variable: culture. The dependent variable, on the other hand, is examined in three phases: pre-purchase considerations, the purchasing process, and post purchase cosiderations. Pre-purchase considerations include how consumers search for, receive, and interpret information, which decision making criteria they use, their evaluation of alternatives, and how much they are affected from the people around them. Purchase decisions refer to factors like the number of people involved in the decision, the time spent to make it, the number of alternatives considered, the criteria considered at the time of making the purchase, etc. Finally, post-purchase considerations include the value provided by a purchase, consumption patterns and evaluations of the purchase made. Based on the relationships between the seven dimensions of culture and the three phases of the purchasing process, a large number of propositions have been generated. These propositions provide a very rich and promising field to conduct empirical research and test the applicability and usefulness of the proposed matrix. However, they are not claimed to be collectively exhaustive. Although a compilation of seven dimensions that have been thought to have the closest and the most obvious relationships with various components of the purchasing process are considered here, it is possible to enrich the number and variety of the dimensions of culture that may directly or indirectly influence consumers’ decisions. Such theoretical contributions may increase the number of these propositions even further.

 

"TOWARD A DYNAMIC MODEL OF EXTERNAL INFORMATION SEARCH"

Jinkook Lee, University of Tennessee

 

"THERE’S NEVER ENOUGH TIME: EXPLORING TIME SCARCITY"

Carol Kaufman-Scarborough, Rutgers University

Jay D. Lindquist, Western Michigan University

Study goals were to identify feelings and behaviors tied to individual’s perception of time scarcity. Intuitive logic suggests that the feeling of time scarcity should be directly related to the actual behavioral demands experienced in any given time period.The authors contend that the feeling of being in short time supply is more closely related to an individual’s psychological time perceptions (Kaufman, Lane and Lindquist 1991).That is, given the same or similar external behavioral demand situation, some people generally perceive a greater sense of time scarcity than others. A sample of adult heads of households participated in the study. A validated time supply scale (Kaufman and Lane 1997) was the dependent (criterion) variable and the independent variables were relevant items from the literature. A five predictor variable regression equation resulted with an adjusted R square of 31.2 percent.Three variables were thought-process related and two were resultant-behavior related. No external time demand variables appeared in the equation.

 

"RESPONSE TO BRAND PLACEMENT: THE EFFECTS OF CONTEXT AND PLACEMENT CHARACTERISTICS"

Kenneth R. Lord, Mercer University

Pola B. Gupta, University of Northern Iowa

Brand placements in films and other media are by nature more context dependent than most forms of marketing communication. This research goes beyond earlier efforts at measuring brand-placement effectiveness by modeling audience response as a function of context (program involvement, emotion and attitude) and placement (valence, prominence and realism) characteristics and the "fit" between the two. Results show that this combination of variables significantly affects recall of and attitude toward brands placed in movies.

 

"THE EFFECT OF STOCHASTIC PROCESSES IN LOTTO GAME PURCHASE"

Dick Mizerski, Griffith University, Australia

Kate Mizerski, Griffith University, Australia

Rohan Miller, Griffith University, Australia

The game of Lotto is the most popular of all US State lottery products. However, little research has uncovered the process involved in its purchase, nor that marketing activity can affect purchasing. An NBD model of repeat purchase is applied to self-report data about Lotto play. There is a good fit of the predicted to actual user groups in terms of number of purchasers and volume of tickets accounted for by user category. As expected, no obvious demographic differences were evident between these light and heavy users. Implications for public policy and management are discussed.

 

"CONSUMER INFORMATION SEARCH IN A WEB-BASED DECISION ENVIRONMENT: DO CONSUMERS SEARCH MORE?"

Robert Moore, Mississippi State University

Girish Punj, University of Connecticut

This study examines the effects of changes in the decision environment on information search processes and outcomes, specifically between Web-based and traditional environments. The behavioral changes that are most important to marketers address the following issuers: 1) Do consumers engage in more search? If more information is used, a more informed decision should be made. 2) Are fewer alternatives considered suitable? If fewer alternatives are in the consideration set, then the probability of selection is higher and firms are facing fewer competitors. 3) Does the content of the consideration set change? A more homogenous consideration set infers that alternatives are considered substitutes and can easily be replaced. And, 4) how does the complexity of the decision problem affect decision outcomes in the Web decision environment.

The results indicate that considerations sets developed via the Web are more homogenous and are fewer in number than sets developed in a traditional information environment. Other findings suggest that individuals use a bottom up processing approach in web environments as opposed to a top down approach in the traditional environment.

 

"THE ORGANIZATION OF PRODUCT INFORMATION IN MEMORY: DO CONSUMERS THINK IN PRODUCT CLASSES?"

Kaj P. N. Morel, Erasmus University Rotterdam

Jan P. L. Schoormans, Delft University of Technology

The basic-level superiority hypothesis is evaluated for consumer product sorting. A literature review shows that no clear picture exists with respect to the classification modes consumers use during product categorization. It also shows that research on basic-level superiority has never used a "true" classification task (i.e., free sorting). In this study, subjects (N=29) sorted 46 (52) products from the product group electrical equipment (furniture), encompassing 20 (5) basic-level categories. The results did not support the basic-level superiority hypothesis. Although consumers recognized basic-level categories, they predominantly produced subordinate or superordinate sorts, depending on the degree of distinction within the stimulus set. An additional finding was that subjects showed high levels of correspondence with regard to the (non basic-level) sorts they created. Together, these results suggest that people classify products according to a similar principle, albeit not according to the basic-level principle. Implications of these results are discussed.

 

"UNDERSTANDING INTERGENERATIONAL TRANSFER OF INFLUENCE PROCESSES AND FACILITATING CONDITIONS"

Jyotsna Mukherji, Texas A & M International University

Daniel L. Sherrell, The University of Memphis

T. Bettina Cornwell, The University of Memphis

 

"MEASURING ATTENTION-RELATED CONSTRUCTS ON A WEB BROWSER"

Robert S. Owen, Penn State University, Berks

With over a century of experince at using physical instruments to imply attention-related constructs, we continue to use methods that are very much like those used in the time of William James. Nonetheless, the theoretical principles behind these methods are still valid. Methods that have been used in the past and methods that are now available on a Web browser are reviewed. Unlike methods of the past, the Web opens up laboratory research in attention to a large population of prospective subjects with little investment in equipment.

 

"DIFFERENCE SCORES VERSUS INDEPENDENT EFFECTS"

Thomas J. Page, Jr, Michigan State University

Richard Spreng, Michigan State University

Difference scores have been widely used in many areas of marketing research. While there have been numerous criticisms of difference scores, this paper demonstrates that an implicit assumption of difference scores, that has never been tested in consumer research, may not be satisfied. That assumption is that the two components of the difference score have equal but opposite effects on the criterion variable. Using data from a consumer satisfaction study, the authors demonstrate that this assumption frequently may not be satisfied, and thus may result in misleading conclusions. An independent effects model, in which each component’s effect is tested, is shown to be a more appropriate alternative in such cases. In addition, since perceived service quality and consumer satisfaction research frequently use difference scores, some theoretical implications for research in this area are discussed.

 

"CONSUMERS’ ATTITUDINAL PROFILES: CONGRUENCE ANALYSIS OF COGNITIVE, AFFECTIVE AND BEHAVIOURAL COMPONENTS"

Jacques-Marie Aurifeille, The University of La Reunion

Fabrice Clerfeuille, University de Nantes

Pascale G. Quester, The University of Adelaide

 

"SELF-EXPRESSION IN PERSONAL WEBSITES"

Hope Jensen Schau, University of California

This paper explores self-expression through the construction and maintenance of personal websites. Three themes emerge: 1) distinctions between and among personal, professional and commercial sites are ambiguous and arbitrary, 2) the scripted nature of site content is a powerful tool of self-expression in real life social interactions, and 3) websites have the capacity to provide a sense of fixedness, or place. The three themes together strongly suggest that personal websites are extensions of self (Belk 1988) intended to impact material circumstances, rather than the disembodied projections often described by cyber theorists (c.f. Haraway 1991 & 1997; Turkle 1996; Wilbur 1997).

 

"INTRA-HOUSEHOLD DIFFUSION OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES: CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATION AND ILLUSTRATIVE EXAMPLE"

Chuan-Fong (Eric) Shih, University of California, Irvine

Alladi Venkatesh, University of California, Irvine

This research introduces a conceptual model labeled Intra-Household Diffusion as a framework for the study of how technology spreads within a unit of adoption. Our interest is in investigating how households use technology and the role technology plays in family life. The theoretical framework underlying the model is best described as modified structural approach to the study of family behavior and its focus is on the interactions between social space and the technology space of the family. The diffusion of the computer and the Internet within the household is used as an illustrative example and changes in household use of the technology are specifically modeled. Data and findings are presented from a study conducted under a grant from National Science Foundation. We also discuss the model’s implications for theorizing about technology in te home and new product developments.

 

"CONSUMERS AND PRODUCT PRO-SOCIAL CREDENCE CHARACTERISTICS"

Lucie Sirieix, ENSA-Montpellier

Credence characteristics are product characteristics that consumers cannot evaluate, even after the consumption experience. Among them, two types can be distinguished: consumer-oriented characteristics on the one hand, and pro-social characteristics on the other hand. The aim of this paper is to check the importance of such characteristics for consumers, and the relevance of communication strategies based on them. The first part presents the theoretical background related to quality indicators and characteristics, and a review of the literature oriented towards consumers’ environmental concern and behaviors. The second part describes the purpose and procedure of an exploratory research on pro-social characteristics, and discusses its results and implications.

 

"SUBJECTIVE DISCRETIONARY INCOME AND LATER LIFE SATISFACTION"

Tao Sun, University of Minnesota

Based on the well-established DDB Needham Life Style data, this study replicates and extends earlier studies of the correlates of life satisfaction among the elderly. Besides replicating previous research that health is a predictor of later life satisfaction (LLS), the study introduced a new variableBsubjective discretionary income (SDI). It was found that SDI was another significant predictor of LLS. Marketing implications were discussed.

 

"ENVIRONMENTAL CONSUMERISM AND THE COMMITMENT/CONSISTENCY PRINCIPLE: ELICITING CONSUMER PARTICIPATION"

Rajiv Vaidyanathan, University of Minnesota, Duluth

Research has consistently found that despite a high degree of expressed concern about the environment on the part of individuals, far fewer are willing to follow-up this concern with behavioral actions in support of the environment, especially when these actions require the individuals to absorb some costs. Using the theoretical framework of the Commitment/Consistency Principle (Cialdini 1993), this study examined the effect of small consumer commitment to an environmental cause on their preference for a product that supported that cause. The empirical results show strong support for the fact that getting consumers to make an active commitment to a cause is an important prerequisite for behavioral consistency (in terms of willingness to buy a product) with the expressed concern for that cause. Implications for marketing researchers and practitioners are discussed.

 

"ATTENTION AND LIKING JUDGMENTS TOWARDS ADVERTISING"

Gewei Ye, Ohio State University

Fred van Raaij, Erasmus University

 

"TOWARDS MORE EFFECTIVE ADVERTISING: UNDERSTANDING CULTURAL VALUES AND IMPORTANT POSSESSIONS"

John J. Watson, University of Canterbury

Tamara E. Gillan, University of Canterbury

Steve Lysonski, Marquette University

Leslie A. Raymore, Lincoln University

 

"CONSUMER REACTION TO DIFFERENT PRICING FORMATS: A STUDY OF THE RESIDENTIAL ELECTRICITY SUPPLY INDUSTRY"

Jason Weiss, University of Maine

Mario Teisl, University of Maine

 

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