Working Paper Poster Session Service and Interpersonal Relationships

[ to cite ]:
(1999) ,"Working Paper Poster Session Service and Interpersonal Relationships", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 26, eds. Eric J. Arnould and Linda M. Scott, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 268-269.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 26, 1999      Pages 268-269

WORKING PAPER POSTER SESSION

SERVICE AND INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS

 

POSITIVE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CERTAIN TYPES OF NEGATIVE EMOTIONS AND CUSTOMER SATISFACTION: THE MODERATING ROLE OF TEMPORAL LOCATION

Laurette DubT, McGill University, Canada

Kalyani Menon, McGill University, Canada

A longitudinal study tested the proposition that a significant part of positive relationships between situation-attributed negative emotions asuch as anxiety (SAN) and satisfaction with services results from adaptation in the provider performance (i.e., more positive performance) in response to consumers’ expression of these negative emotions. Consumers of health care facilities (n=74) provided daily reports of their emotional states (SAN) and retrospective satisfaction judgments for service components provided at the middle (medical and paramedical services), at the extremes (administrative services), and on a continuous basis (logistics and atmosphere) during the service. As expected, Seemingly Unrelated Regression revealed that post-purchase satisfaction with specific aspects of the service were postively related to SAN that were expressed at the same temporal location as the delivery of those aspects of the service. Theoretical and managerial implications of the findings are discussed.

 

TRANSLATING CONSUMER VALUES IN OPERATIONAL AND STRUCTURAL ATTRIBUTES FOR EXTENDED SERVICE TRANSACTIONS

Laurette DubT, McGill University, Canada

Michael D. Johnson, University of Michigan

Leo Mark Renaghan, Cornell University

Kunal Gupta, McGill University, Canada

The paper highlights the need for translating higher-level customer benefits and values to the operational and structural aspects of extended service transactions. Analyses of the interviews conducted across six nations suggest that the elicited product and service attributes were related to all categories of operational and structural aspects of services. These attributes were also found to be related to a diverse set of subjective higher order customer needs and human values. Together they suggest linkages between experiential consequences and specific aspects of the service operations. We conclude by discussion research implications and potential future developments.

 

EFFECTS OF BACKGROUND MUSIC VALENCE ON SERVICE QUALITY: MEDIATING ROLE OF SERVICESCAPE AND PROVIDER’S INTERPERSONAL PERFORMANCE

Sylvie Morin, McGill University, Canada

Laurette DubT, McGill University, Canada

Jean-Charles ChTbat, HEC-Montreal, Canada

An experimental study (153 subjects) manipulated background music (positive-negative valence; no-music) using videoilm simulation of retail banking services. Subjects reported their attitudes toward servicescape, toward the provider’s interpersonal performance and service quality. Structural analyses (EQS) were performed. In the no-music condition, customer’s attitudes toward servicescape and toward the provider’s interpersonal performance contributed equally to service quality. Under valenced background music conditions, servicescape direct effect on service quality decreased, that of interpersonal performance increased, with servicescape having a direct influence on interpersonal performance. Music valence did not have a direct effect on service quality. Theoretical and managerial implications of the results are discussed.

 

A CROSS-CULTURAL VALIDATION OF THE CONSUMER SUSCEPTIBILITY TO INTERPERSONAL INFLUENCE SCALE

Denver D’Rozario, Howard University

Bearden, Netemeyer and Teel’s (1989) Susceptibility to Interpersonal Influence scale was developed on Mid-western U.S. samples. However, we do not know what the structure or properties of this scale are, in samples drawn from U.S. micro-cultures. I investigate both issues, by drawing separate samples of African-, Asian- and Hispanic-Americans, as well as of Anglo-Americans in the U.S.. Key differences were found in the structure or properties of this scale or both, between all four groups of this study and that of the original. Thus, the original scale is modified and its proper use in each of these populations is discussed

 

STAYING YOUNG OR AGING GRACEFULLY? THE IMPORTANCE OF COHORT EFFECTS IN PREFERRED PRODUCT ASSOCIATIONS

Heather Hornea, University of California-Berkeley

Segmentation and production positioning issues are of critical importance to marketers. This paper proposes that the zeitgeist (general trend of thought, feeling and expression) of the period during which a cohort group comes of age will continue to influence product preferences and associations as this group matures. Study 1 investigates preferred product associations based on their connection to values popular at the time an individual came of age. Building on the literature in sociology and marketing we hypothesize that individuals who came of age during the years 1945-1963 value hard work, status and patriotism, that individuals who came of age during the years 1961-1976 value experience and iconoclasm,that individuals who came of age during the years 1967-1987 value self-discovery and that individuals who came of age during the years 1978-1993 value financial success, power and patriotism. In the context of the product category automobiles, 87 adults rated their preference for product associations related to these values. All results are in the expected direction. A follow-up study with stronger operationalizations of popular values by the incorporating symbols and expressions is briefly described. Implications for advertisers are discussed.

 

HOW DO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHILDREN INFLUENCE THEIR PARENTS?

Laura A. Williams, San Diego State University

Alvin C. Burns, Louisiana State University

While it has been found that children exert varying degrees of influence on family decision processes and that children’s influence varies by product, child, parental and family characteristics, very little research has explored how children exert influence. To fill this gap in the research on child influence the present research examines children’s direct influence attempts in a purchase context and develops a typology of direct influence attempts based on social power theory. Through depth interviews wth children aged 7-9 and their mothers eight direct influence attempt types are identified

 

THE VALUE OF RECOGNITION: BETTER TO BE A WINNER OR HELP A LOSER?

Robert J. Fisher, University of Western Ontario, Canada

Is recognition a more effective incentive to volunteer for members of successful or unsuccessful groups? The research investigates this question with an experiment that manipulates perceptions of group success, and evaluates the effects of a promise of recognition on the number of hours donated to a fundraising drive. Contrary to a self-presentation by association perspective, the results indicate that the promise of recognition is an effective incentive only when the group seeking help is portrayed as unsuccessful. The research has important implications for understanding the consumption of recognition and the strategies used by organizations to increase volunteer participation.

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