Working Paper Poster Session Advertising Effects

[ to cite ]:
(1999) ,"Working Paper Poster Session Advertising Effects", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 26, eds. Eric J. Arnould and Linda M. Scott, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 266-267.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 26, 1999      Pages 266-267

WORKING PAPER POSTER SESSION

ADVERTISING EFFECTS

 

FEMALE IMAGES IN ADVERTISING: SOCIAL COMPARISON AMONG BRITISH WOMEN

Margaret Hogg, Manchester School of Management, United Kingdom

Margaret Bruce, Manchester School of Management, United Kingdom

Kerry Hough, Manchester School of Management, United Kingdom

How far does advertising exploit consumer tendencies to distort their body image by creating insecurities and dissatisfaction with the self? This research drew on earlier U.S. studies to investigate British women’s responses to idealized images. Some women raised their standards of comparisons and lowered their own self assessments after viewing the ideal images. However the impact of the ideal images varied according to firstly, the goal, and secondly, the different stages of the social comparison process. The women employed a variety of strategies when consuming the idealized images portrayed in fashion advertising and these strategies are interpreted in the context of social comparison theory.

 

ADVERTISING EFFECTS ON BRAND SEARCH BEHAVIOR: CONCEPTUAL MODEL AND RESEARCH PROPOSITIONS

Sandipa Dublish, Farleigh Dickinson University

Paul Miniard, Florida International University

This paper focuses on a research gap in the prepurchase search literature, namely, the influence of advertising on consumers’ prepurchase search. The paper provides a theoretical framework for examining the effects of advertising on consumers’ prepurchase search for the advertised focal brand and its competitors. A conceptual model of advertising effects on prepurchase brand search combining insights from advertising-information processing and search literatures is presented in the paper. The model examines a situation where exposure to advertising occurs prior to seeking information from any other source. Hence, the impact of advertising on subsequent choice is the topic of interest. The model proposes that attitudinal responses generated by focal brand advertising (attitude toward the ad/brand) mediate advertising effects on search attitudes and behaviors and consequently alter brand preference and choice. Research propositions are also presented.

 

THE INTERPLAY OF STRUCTURAL AND PHENOMENOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES IN ADVERTISING MONTAGE

Val Larsen, Truman State University

Newell D. Wright, James Madison University

Tom Hergert, Virginia Polythechnic Institute

This paper explores the effects of advertising montage in light of Gerard Genette and Semour Chatman’s structuralist film theories and Wolfgang Iser’s phenomenological reader response theory. The structuralist film theory is used to defin objective dimensions of ad form, the Iserian reader response theory to predict likely responses to different montage patterns. The theories are evaluated empirically in an experiment.

 

EXAMINING THE INFLUENCE OF NAME SUGGESTIVENESS AND CLAM DIRECTNESS ON THE EFFICACY OF ACROSS-CLASS COMPARITIVE CLAIMS

Stuart Van Auken, California State University, Chico

Arthur J. Adams, University of Louisville

Comparative claims that cross product classes within the same product category can create reference points that lead to brand differentiation relative to within-class rivals and/or a positioning in a more "valued" class. This study addresses issues and perspectives associated with using comparative ads in communicating attribute upgrades. Particular attention is given to the use of suggestive versus nonsuggestive names and direct versus indirect claims in developing across-class positionings. Attention is also devoted to the role of global affect transfer in such positionings.

 

REPETITION OF EMOTIONAL ADVERTISING: DOES AFFECT INTENSITY MAKE A DIFFERENCE?

David Moore, University of Michigan

This study investigated the manner in which high versus low Affect Intensity individuals respond to three levels of repetition (1, 3, or 5) of an emotionally provocative TV advertising appeal. For positive emotional responses (e.g., touched, moved), high affect intensity subjects scored higher than low affect intensity subjects particularly at the highest level of repetition. Conversely, in response to measures of advertising wearout and satiation, it was the low affect intensity subjects who scored higher than their high affect intensity counterparts at the highest level of repetition. Advertisers should therefore note that individual differences in temperaments can significantly determine the consumerUs ability to sustain high levels of repetition of advertising appeals.

 

COMPARING THE SYMBOLIC AND INFORMATIONAL EFFECTS OF LANGUAGE USE IN ETHNIC TARGETED COMMUNICATIONS STRATEGIES

Ellen E. Touchstone, California State University

Scott Koslow, University of Waikato, New Zealand

Prem Shamsadani, National University of Singapore, Singapore

Prior research has approached the use of ethnic languages in subcultural communication settings as either a symbol to invoke accommodation or as a method of communicating information efficiently. This research combines the two traditions by showing that the symbolic and informational effects of language usage are not independent. When ethnic language dominant immigrant consumers become confused during complex service encounters, they look for contextual cues to infer meaning. These cues may go in favor of the service provider if the consumer interprets him or her as accommodating, or it may go against the service provider if the consumer interprets him or her as being discriminating. A field study on Hispanic immigrants in Los Angeles was conducted to explore these language related effects. The implications are that failing to provide services in Spanish may lead Hispanic immigrant consumers to infer a racist intent, even if none were intended.

 

TOWARD AN UNDERSTANDING OF GENDER, PERSONALITY AND CULTURAL DIFFERENCES IN RESPONSES TO CHARITY AD APPEALS

FrTdTric F. Brunel, Boston University

Michelle R. Nelson, Emerson College

This research investigates responses to self-centered and altruistic appeals Results support that gender influences message evaluation and that personality differences and cultural attributes may explain these gendered responses. Study one establishes differences between men and women’s evaluations of "help-self" versus "help-others" appeals in the United States. In study two, gender differences in moral orientation allow to explain gendered preferences. When compared to males, females demonstrate greater caring and preferred the "help-others" to the "help-self" ad. Moral orientation mediates the effect of gender on ad preference. The last study tests similar relationships in Denmark, where gender-based ad preferences are the same as in the U.S. sample. However, Danish preferences are not mediated by moral orientation. Strategic implications from this perspective of a socio-cultural construction of gender are provided.

 

DIRECTION OF GAZE AS A MEASURE OF CULTURAL DIMENSIONS IN ADVERTISING

Marianne Figge, Odense University, Denmark

This study compares print advertising in Denmark and the United States, specifically the gaze behavior of ad characters. Ads from a women’s magazine in each country were analyzed, and it was found that significantly more characters met the reader’s gaze in the American ads, while more charaters in the Danish ads looked away or looked at each other. This difference may indicate a more aggressive advertising style in the US vs. a softer persuasive approach in Denmark, as well as an emphasis in American ads on using products to impress others, vs. an emphasis in Danish ads on enjoying products for one’s own sake.

 

EXTENDING THE MATCH-UP HYPOTHESIS IN CELEBRITY ADVERTISING: THE EFFECTS OF CELEBRITY AND PRODUCT INCONGRUITY AND A MODERATING ROLE OF CONSUMERS’ OPTIMUM STIMULATION LEVEL

Kwon Jung, National University of Singapore, Singapore

Ah Keng Kau, National University of Singapore, Singapore

Chock Fang Wong, National University of Singapore, Singapore

The conventional wisdom of celebrity advertising, the so-called the match-up hypothesis that suggests a match or fit between celebrity and product as a crucial factor in creating an effective celebrity advertisement, was critically re-examined in this paper. An alternative hypothesis based on Mandler’s (1982) model, which predicts an inverted U-shaped relationship between different levels of match/mismatch and evaluations of advertisement, was considered as another possibility. These two alternative predictions were, then, incorporated into a generalized framework of celebrity advertising by using individual differences in Optimum Stimulation Level (i.e., each individual’s preferred level of environmental stimulation) as a moderating factor.

The results of this study confirmed the proposed framework. It was found that subjects with high OSL showed the response pattern suggested by Mandler’s model, whereas subjects with low OSL showed the response pattern suggested by the match-up hypothesis. That is, subjects with high OSL preferred the moderately mismatched advertisement between celebrity and product to the matched and the extremely mismatched advertisements. On the other hand, subjects with low OSL showed a tendency of preferring the matched advertisement to the mismatched advertisements.

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