Special Session Abstract - S Effects of Advertising Repetition on Consumer Decision Making

[ to cite ]:
(1999) ,"Special Session Abstract - S Effects of Advertising Repetition on Consumer Decision Making", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 26, eds. Eric J. Arnould and Linda M. Scott, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 195.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 26, 1999      Page 195

SPECIAL SESSION ABSTRACT - S

EFFECTS OF ADVERTISING REPETITION ON CONSUMER DECISION MAKING

 

"EFFECTS OF ADVERTISING REPETITION ON THE TRUTH EFFECT FOR DIFFERENT TYPES OF PRODUCT ATTRIBUTE"

Angela Y. Lee, Northwestern University

Shi Zhang, University of California, Los Angeles

The present research examines how repetition may affect the consumer’s belief towards product attributes that are either common or unique to the brands. Preliminary results of two studies show that common (versus different) attributes were judged to be more true of the brand. However, for those participants who were familiar with the product category, repetition of the product description is found to enhance the truth rating of different but not common attributes, and the reverse is found for those who were not familiar with the product category. Our results also indicate a dissociation between the effect of repetition on truth rating and recall of the attributes.

 

"ADVERTISING REPETITION AND QUALITY PERCEPTIONS"

Sridhar Moorthy, University of Toronto, Canada

Scott A. Hawkins, University of Toronto, Canada

Nelson (1970) has argued that advertising spending is a signal of product quality for experience goods because consumers can rationally infer that higher quality products advertise more than lower quality products. In this paper we compare Nelson’s predictions against alternative marketing theories that also seek to explain the relationship between ad repetition and quality perceptions: mere exposure effects, learning theory, and attitude toward the ad. Our results show limited support for Nelson’s theory, but substantial support for ad repetition influencing attitude toward the ad, which in turn influences perceived quality.

 

"ENHANCING BRAND AND ATTITUDE ACCESSIBILITY: THE EFFECTS OF ADVERTISING REPETITION ON CHOICE"

Andrew A. Mitchell, University of Toronto, Canada

Advertising repetition has been shown to affect both brand accessibility (Nedungadi, Mitchell and Berger, 1995) and attitude accessibility (Berger and Mitchell, 1989. What is not clearly understood is how, and under what conditions brand and attitude accessibility affect choice. Within a spreading activation theory of memory, brand accessibility is the strength of the link between the product category and the brand nodes, while attitude accessibility is the strength of the link between the brand and brand attitude nodes. The present research examines the effect of brand and attitude accessibility on choice under high and low involvement conditions.

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