Special Session Summary Time Is on My Side: Duration Effects on Consumption Experiences

Naomi Mandel, Arizona State University
[ to cite ]:
Naomi Mandel (2003) ,"Special Session Summary Time Is on My Side: Duration Effects on Consumption Experiences", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 30, eds. Punam Anand Keller and Dennis W. Rook, Valdosta, GA : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 105.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 30, 2003     Page 105

SPECIAL SESSION SUMMARY

TIME IS ON MY SIDE: DURATION EFFECTS ON CONSUMPTION EXPERIENCES

Naomi Mandel, Arizona State University

Why do we sometimes enjoy the anticipation of an event, while in other cases we prefer instant gratification? Why do we sometimes want to get an unpleasant experience "over with" while in other cases we choose to procrastinate? This session provided an integrative view on the various conditions under which delaying an outcome might be beneficial to the consumer. The session examined consumer experiences during and after waiting for a variety of products and services, including candy and soft drinks as well as vacations and mammograms. The effects of anticipation and delay were explored for both positive and negative outcomes, and potential moderators of these effects were also examined.

 

IS HOPE TO ENJOY MORE ENJOYED THAN HOPE ENJOYED?

Raj Raghunathan, University of Texas, Austin

Ashesh Mukherji, McGill University

Do people enjoy planning for a future pleasurable experience more than they enjoy the actual experience itself? Evidence from two studies indicates that this may indeed be so. Results from these studies suggest that the focus of consumer attention during the planning and event phases may partly account for these results. Specifically, a focus on desirability issues during the planning of the event and on feasibility issues during the event itself enhanced enjoyment from the planning and eroded enjoyment from the actual event.

 

THE EFFECT OF A FORCED DELAY AFTER CHOICE ON CONSUMPTION ENJOYMENT

Stephen M. Nowlis, Arizona State University

Deborah Brown McCabe, University of Arizona

Naomi Mandel, Arizona State University

A consumer purchasing a product is often forced to wait before consuming it. We propose that the consequence of such a wait on consumption enjoyment depends on both the negative utility of the wait itself and on the positive utility of anticipating the consumption. These factors can exert different degrees of influence depending on characteristics of the decision task. In several studies, we found that participants forced to wait before consuming chocolate enjoyed the chocolate more than those who consumed it immediately. Yet despite the hedonic boost provided by the delay, participants forced to delay consumption did not enjoy waiting, nor did they choose to wait in the future. Furthermore, we found that the vividness of the product stimulus moderated these effects.

 

BUT I DON’T WANT TO GO: WHEN WAIT MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES EXACERBATE STRESS

Elizabeth Gelfand Miller, University of Pennsylvania

Mary Frances Luce, University of Pennsylvania

Barbara E. Kahn, University of Pennsylvania

While much research has been devoted to methods for reducing consumers’ stress during waiting, we argue that the literature has ignored a crucial moderating factor, namely the valence of the waited-for event. In three experiments, we demonstrate that waiting can actually be positive in aversive environments and that standard interventions suggested to 'manage’ waits (e.g., providing duration information) can actually exacerbate stress in these environments. We also explore the process behind these effects. Based on these results, we argue that marketers should consider the characteristics of their service or good, as well as the emotional state of their customers, when determining the best way to manage waits.

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