Consuming to Achieve Affective Goals: a Framework For Analysis With Application

W. Edward Roth, Penn State University
ABSTRACT - A framework for analyzing how people use consumer objects to achieve affective goals is developed. The term affective consumption refers to the use of a good to achieve an affective goal of either entering a positively valenced affective state, or leaving a negatively valenced one. Affective goals may be achieved using either an instant gratification strategy or a delayed gratification strategy. The two dimensions of goal and strategy are crossed to form a two-by-two framework delineating four types of affective consumption: sensation, relief, recovery, and fulfillment. This framework is then applied to interview data gathered from ten users of health and fitness centers, and is found to be useful in analyzing and categorizing affective goals involved in the use of these centers. Implications for consumer research are discussed, as are directions for future research.
[ to cite ]:
W. Edward Roth (2001) ,"Consuming to Achieve Affective Goals: a Framework For Analysis With Application", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28, eds. Mary C. Gilly and Joan Meyers-Levy, Valdosta, GA : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 217.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 28, 2001     Page 217

CONSUMING TO ACHIEVE AFFECTIVE GOALS: A FRAMEWORK FOR ANALYSIS WITH APPLICATION

W. Edward Roth, Penn State University

ABSTRACT -

A framework for analyzing how people use consumer objects to achieve affective goals is developed. The term affective consumption refers to the use of a good to achieve an affective goal of either entering a positively valenced affective state, or leaving a negatively valenced one. Affective goals may be achieved using either an instant gratification strategy or a delayed gratification strategy. The two dimensions of goal and strategy are crossed to form a two-by-two framework delineating four types of affective consumption: sensation, relief, recovery, and fulfillment. This framework is then applied to interview data gathered from ten users of health and fitness centers, and is found to be useful in analyzing and categorizing affective goals involved in the use of these centers. Implications for consumer research are discussed, as are directions for future research.

----------------------------------------