Need For Cognition and the Effects of Repeated Expression on Attitude Accessibility and Extremity

Stephen M. Smith, North Georgia College
Curtis P. Haugtvedt, Ohio State University
Richard E. Petty, Ohio State University
ABSTRACT - An abundance of empirical data supports the notion that an attitude's accessibility is a key determinant of the attitude's likelihood of influencing judgment and behavior (see Fazio, forthcoming, for a review). Repeated expression of an attitude has been shown to enhance attitude accessibility, but recent findings suggest that attitude polarization is another possible consequence of this procedure. We conducted a study to determine if these polarization and accessibility effects might be partially mediated by increases in attitude-relevant thought. Consistent with this reasoning, subjects high in their need for cognition (NFC) showed both greater polarization and greater accessibility increases than did low NFC subjects.
[ to cite ]:
Stephen M. Smith, Curtis P. Haugtvedt, and Richard E. Petty (1994) ,"Need For Cognition and the Effects of Repeated Expression on Attitude Accessibility and Extremity", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 21, eds. Chris T. Allen and Deborah Roedder John, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 234-237.