The Effects of Comparative Advertising on the Evaluation of Information

P. J. O'Connor, Baruch College, CUNY
Joan Rosenberg, student, Baruch College, CUNY
Ira Bloom, student, Baruch College, CUNY
Lorraine Abruzzo, student, Baruch College, CUNY
ABSTRACT - In general, research that has been conducted in the area of comparative advertising has focused upon the attitudinal and/or behavioral effects. Also, the comparisons have been made in terms of attributes of the product class. The present study uses "real", i.e. non-student, consumers to investigate the information value of comparative advertising. Specifically, the content, usefulness, and believability of information presented in comparative versus non-comparative formats is analyzed. In addition, pricing superiority as a dimension is explicitly considered. The results indicate that while comparative advertising tends to be superior, the effects are dependent upon the specific type of comparison being made.
[ to cite ]:
P. J. O'Connor, Joan Rosenberg, Ira Bloom, and Lorraine Abruzzo (1986) ,"The Effects of Comparative Advertising on the Evaluation of Information", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13, eds. Richard J. Lutz, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 670.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13, 1986      Page 670

THE EFFECTS OF COMPARATIVE ADVERTISING ON THE EVALUATION OF INFORMATION

P. J. O'Connor, Baruch College, CUNY

Joan Rosenberg, student, Baruch College, CUNY

Ira Bloom, student, Baruch College, CUNY

Lorraine Abruzzo, student, Baruch College, CUNY

ABSTRACT -

In general, research that has been conducted in the area of comparative advertising has focused upon the attitudinal and/or behavioral effects. Also, the comparisons have been made in terms of attributes of the product class. The present study uses "real", i.e. non-student, consumers to investigate the information value of comparative advertising. Specifically, the content, usefulness, and believability of information presented in comparative versus non-comparative formats is analyzed. In addition, pricing superiority as a dimension is explicitly considered. The results indicate that while comparative advertising tends to be superior, the effects are dependent upon the specific type of comparison being made.

For further information, write to:

P. J. O'Connor / Dept. of Marketing, Box 508 / Bernard Baruch College / City University of New York / 17 Lexington Avenue / New York, NY 10010

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