An Investigation of the Relationship of Behavioral, As Compared to Experiential, Measures of Music Involvement With Consumer Market Responses to New Rock Music

Richard Mizerski, Florida State University
Marya J. Pucely, Florida State University
Lori Baldwin, Florida State University
ABSTRACT - This study experimentally tests the relationship of several measures of music involvement to a select group of consumer responses to new rock music. Two measures of music participation and two measures of experiential involvement are evaluated in terms of reliability, and their relationship to affect toward, attention paid, and intention to purchase new rock music. The two usage-based involvement measures were found to have relatively poor internal reliability and a low to nonexistent relationship to memory, evaluation and intent to purchase measures. The experientially-based involvement measures had a significant relationship to evaluative and purchase intent measures, but these relationships were song specific. In total, these results suggest that experientially-based involvement measures outperform usage-based measures in all criteria, and that music involvement appears to be song specific rather than general in nature.
[ to cite ]:
Richard Mizerski, Marya J. Pucely, and Lori Baldwin (1986) ,"An Investigation of the Relationship of Behavioral, As Compared to Experiential, Measures of Music Involvement With Consumer Market Responses to New Rock Music", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13, eds. Richard J. Lutz, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 669.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13, 1986      Page 669

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP OF BEHAVIORAL, AS COMPARED TO EXPERIENTIAL, MEASURES OF MUSIC INVOLVEMENT WITH CONSUMER MARKET RESPONSES TO NEW ROCK MUSIC

Richard Mizerski, Florida State University

Marya J. Pucely, Florida State University

Lori Baldwin, Florida State University

ABSTRACT -

This study experimentally tests the relationship of several measures of music involvement to a select group of consumer responses to new rock music. Two measures of music participation and two measures of experiential involvement are evaluated in terms of reliability, and their relationship to affect toward, attention paid, and intention to purchase new rock music. The two usage-based involvement measures were found to have relatively poor internal reliability and a low to nonexistent relationship to memory, evaluation and intent to purchase measures. The experientially-based involvement measures had a significant relationship to evaluative and purchase intent measures, but these relationships were song specific. In total, these results suggest that experientially-based involvement measures outperform usage-based measures in all criteria, and that music involvement appears to be song specific rather than general in nature.

For further information, write to:

Professor Richard Mizerski / Florida State University College of Business / Tallahassee, FL 32306

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