Products For Special Needs: Problems Experienced By Disabled Consumers

Roger M. Kramer, University of Arizona
ABSTRACT - This paper examines the need to bring disabled consumers into closer contact with the products they need to make independent living possible. There is a decided lack of information about where to find products. A literature review and a survey of disabled consumers concludes that seldom are they able to secure or find the products they need to alleviate the effects of their disabilities. Traditionally, the disabled are considered customers of the medical-institutional-commercial market. Consequently, many of the products they need are not available in the open market. Architectural, attitudinal, transportation and communication barriers are also restricting their role as consumers. There is a need to advocate for long overdue improvements in their products. Essential goods are lacking altogether in many instances; in others, they may be unreliable or exorbitantly expensive.
[ to cite ]:
Roger M. Kramer (1986) ,"Products For Special Needs: Problems Experienced By Disabled Consumers", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13, eds. Richard J. Lutz, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 668.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13, 1986      Page 668

PRODUCTS FOR SPECIAL NEEDS: PROBLEMS EXPERIENCED BY DISABLED CONSUMERS

Roger M. Kramer, University of Arizona

ABSTRACT -

This paper examines the need to bring disabled consumers into closer contact with the products they need to make independent living possible. There is a decided lack of information about where to find products. A literature review and a survey of disabled consumers concludes that seldom are they able to secure or find the products they need to alleviate the effects of their disabilities. Traditionally, the disabled are considered customers of the medical-institutional-commercial market. Consequently, many of the products they need are not available in the open market. Architectural, attitudinal, transportation and communication barriers are also restricting their role as consumers. There is a need to advocate for long overdue improvements in their products. Essential goods are lacking altogether in many instances; in others, they may be unreliable or exorbitantly expensive.

For further information, write to:

Professor Roger M. Kramer / School of Family and Consumer Resources / University of Arizona / Tucson, Arizona 85721

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