Surrealistic Advertising: a Social Adaptation Perspective

Pamela M. Homer, University of Oregon
Lynn R. Kahle, University of Oregon
ABSTRACT - Surrealistic art techniques, an outgrowth of the early 20th century artistic movement, are often visible in modern day advertisements. Although these methods are quite widely used, research concerning their effectiveness and persuasive capabilities is virtually nonexistent. In an experiment subjects were exposed to print ads in which surrealism and priming (i.e., leading subjects to expect forthcoming messages with product-relevant information) were manipulated. Results found that priming influenced recall of message arguments, surrealism led to less incorrect recall of message arguments, and purchase likelihood was significantly related to the interaction of surrealism and priming. These findings were interpreted as supportive of Socii Adaptation Theory.
[ to cite ]:
Pamela M. Homer and Lynn R. Kahle (1986) ,"Surrealistic Advertising: a Social Adaptation Perspective", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13, eds. Richard J. Lutz, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 667.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13, 1986      Page 667

SURREALISTIC ADVERTISING: A SOCIAL ADAPTATION PERSPECTIVE

Pamela M. Homer, University of Oregon

Lynn R. Kahle, University of Oregon

ABSTRACT -

Surrealistic art techniques, an outgrowth of the early 20th century artistic movement, are often visible in modern day advertisements. Although these methods are quite widely used, research concerning their effectiveness and persuasive capabilities is virtually nonexistent. In an experiment subjects were exposed to print ads in which surrealism and priming (i.e., leading subjects to expect forthcoming messages with product-relevant information) were manipulated. Results found that priming influenced recall of message arguments, surrealism led to less incorrect recall of message arguments, and purchase likelihood was significantly related to the interaction of surrealism and priming. These findings were interpreted as supportive of Socii Adaptation Theory.

For further information, write to:

Pamela M. Homer or Lynn R. Kahle / College of Business Administration / University of Oregon / Eugene, Oregon 97403

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