Reported Behavior and Functional Motives: Some Self-Perception Insights

Paula J. Haynes, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
ABSTRACT - This paper examines the use of self-perception attributions within Katz' functional approach. A two stage experiment was employed. First a list of 52 frequently purchased or used items was developed Then a group of 105 undergraduates was given the list Of items and four descriptions corresponding to Katz' four functional motives. Subjects were asked to categorize, if possible, their use or purchase of each item to one of the four descriptions. These responses were treated as self-perception attributions of reported behavior. Two questions were examined: 1) Would the four functions be useful in self-perceptions of past behavior, and 2) Would single functions tend to dominate these reports for each item? An across-subject analysis suggested the four functions could be meaningfully employed in a self perception context. Single motives dominated attributions for only six of the 52 items. The paper concludes with some suggestions on further research involving the functional motive approach with self-perception attributions.
[ to cite ]:
Paula J. Haynes (1986) ,"Reported Behavior and Functional Motives: Some Self-Perception Insights", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13, eds. Richard J. Lutz, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 666.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13, 1986      Page 666

REPORTED BEHAVIOR AND FUNCTIONAL MOTIVES: SOME SELF-PERCEPTION INSIGHTS

Paula J. Haynes, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

ABSTRACT -

This paper examines the use of self-perception attributions within Katz' functional approach. A two stage experiment was employed. First a list of 52 frequently purchased or used items was developed Then a group of 105 undergraduates was given the list Of items and four descriptions corresponding to Katz' four functional motives. Subjects were asked to categorize, if possible, their use or purchase of each item to one of the four descriptions. These responses were treated as self-perception attributions of reported behavior. Two questions were examined: 1) Would the four functions be useful in self-perceptions of past behavior, and 2) Would single functions tend to dominate these reports for each item? An across-subject analysis suggested the four functions could be meaningfully employed in a self perception context. Single motives dominated attributions for only six of the 52 items. The paper concludes with some suggestions on further research involving the functional motive approach with self-perception attributions.

For further information, write to:

Professor Paula J. Haynes / Department of Marketing & Business Law / University of Tennessee at Chattanooga / Chattanooga. Tennessee 37403

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