Effects of Recreation Usage Situation and Previous Experience on Setting Choice

David A. Boag, University of Saskatchewan
ABSTRACT - This research focuses on recreation usage situation influences on the choice of recreation setting. The argument presented is that recreation takes place within a specific recreation usage situation and is likely to have been aided, inhibited or guided by the conditions of that situation and the recreationist's previous recreation participation in it. The paper reports the results of an on-site survey of 379 recreationists who reported their preferences toward ten recreation settings in each of ten different usage situations. A two-way analysis o' variance indicated that preferences toward recreation settings varied across usage situations. Comparing correlation coefficients for preferences on the basis of a test-retest for high and low participation frequencies in each situation provided no support for the theory that more experienced individuals are more stable in their preferences than those less experienced.
[ to cite ]:
David A. Boag (1986) ,"Effects of Recreation Usage Situation and Previous Experience on Setting Choice", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13, eds. Richard J. Lutz, Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 662.

Advances in Consumer Research Volume 13, 1986      Page 662

EFFECTS OF RECREATION USAGE SITUATION AND PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE ON SETTING CHOICE

David A. Boag, University of Saskatchewan

ABSTRACT -

This research focuses on recreation usage situation influences on the choice of recreation setting. The argument presented is that recreation takes place within a specific recreation usage situation and is likely to have been aided, inhibited or guided by the conditions of that situation and the recreationist's previous recreation participation in it. The paper reports the results of an on-site survey of 379 recreationists who reported their preferences toward ten recreation settings in each of ten different usage situations. A two-way analysis o' variance indicated that preferences toward recreation settings varied across usage situations. Comparing correlation coefficients for preferences on the basis of a test-retest for high and low participation frequencies in each situation provided no support for the theory that more experienced individuals are more stable in their preferences than those less experienced.

For further information, write to:

Professor David A. Boag / College of Commerce / University of Saskatchewan / Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 0W0

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