Can Biases About the Future Push Consumers to Act? Effects of Affective Forecasting on Consumer Procrastination

Lily Lin, University of British Columbia, Canada
Timothy Silk, University of British Columbia, Canada
This paper introduces affective forecasting as a means of manipulating forward-looking behavior in an attempt to mitigate procrastination. Three studies show that consumers who make affective forecasts overestimate negative emotions associated with procrastination and attempt to avoid forecasted negative states by initiating and completing tasks earlier than non-forecasters.
[ to cite ]:
Lily Lin and Timothy Silk (2011) ,"Can Biases About the Future Push Consumers to Act? Effects of Affective Forecasting on Consumer Procrastination", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.