Brands and Desire: Implicit Brand Processing Biases Incidental Decision-Making

Philip Harris, University of Melbourne, Australlia
Carsten Murawski, The University of Melbourne, Australlia
This study examined whether implicit brand processing can impact on decision-making for incidental rewards. Findings indicated a bias towards impulsive choices of incidental rewards following subconscious brand logo exposure. Findings of the study were linked with the effect of a generalized affective-motivation mechanism cued by favored brand exposure.
[ to cite ]:
Philip Harris and Carsten Murawski (2011) ,"Brands and Desire: Implicit Brand Processing Biases Incidental Decision-Making", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 38, eds. Darren W. Dahl, Gita V. Johar, and Stijn M.J. van Osselaer, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.