Might a Heavier Waitress Make You Eat More, Less, Or Differently?

Brent McFerran, University of British Columbia, Canada
Darren Dahl, University of British Columbia, Canada
Gavan Fitzsimons, Duke University, USA
Andrea C. Morales, Arizona State University, USA
This paper investigates how consumers react differently to food recommendations made by service personnel who are heavy versus thin. Two studies show that the body type of the experimenter in a taste test study altered both the quantity (Study 1) and choices (Study 2) participants made. Study 1 showed that dieters ate more snacks when the recommender was heavy, but non-dieters ate more when she was thin. Study 2 showed that dieters chose both a healthy and an unhealthy snack more often when it was recommended to them by a heavy (vs. a thin) experimenter.
[ to cite ]:
Brent McFerran, Darren Dahl, Gavan Fitzsimons, and Andrea C. Morales (2010) ,"Might a Heavier Waitress Make You Eat More, Less, Or Differently? ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: v37/acr_v37_15522.pdf.