Fluency and Psychological Distance: Consequences For Construal and Discounting

Anuj K. Shah, Princeton University, USA
Adam L. Alter, New York University, USA
Daniel M. Oppenheimer, Princeton University, USA
We suggest that processing fluency is one plausible mechanism behind the spontaneous estimation of one’s distance from stimuli in the environment (Studies 1 and 2). Building on this basic effect, and consistent with existing theories, we show that disfluency influences how abstractly (vs. concretely) people represent stimuli (Studies 3-5), and which of two future rewards they prefer, depending on how far in the future those rewards are offered (Studies 6 and 7).
[ to cite ]:
Anuj K. Shah, Adam L. Alter, and Daniel M. Oppenheimer (2010) ,"Fluency and Psychological Distance: Consequences For Construal and Discounting ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 227-231 .