When Bodily Sensations Elicit Context Effects: the Moderating Role of Physical Distance

Joan Meyers-Levy, University of Minnesota, USA
Rui (Juliet) Zhu, University of British Columbia, Canada
Lan Jiang, University of British Columbia, Canada
The flooring consumers stand on when shopping can elicit bodily sensations, with comfort instilled by carpeting and fatigue evoked by tile flooring. Like moods, these bodily sensations could foster context effects on observed products. Yet, whereas moods typically prompt only assimilation effects, we sought conditions where consumers’ bodily sensations would produce either assimilation, contrast, or no context effects. We show that consumers’ physical distance from a product can determine the direction of such effects. Further, these effects are (a) prompted by bodily sensations, not conceptual knowledge, (b) rather limited in scope, and (c) reversible in their direction under certain circumstances.
[ to cite ]:
Joan Meyers-Levy, Rui (Juliet) Zhu, and Lan Jiang (2010) ,"When Bodily Sensations Elicit Context Effects: the Moderating Role of Physical Distance", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 41-44 .