Positive Affect, Intertemporal Choice, and Levels of Thinking: Increasing Consumers’ Willingness to Wait

Jin Seok Pyone, Cornell University, USA
Alice M. Isen, Cornell University, USA
Six studies examined the influence of induced positive affect on consumers’ willingness to wait for rewards. Two studies showed that participants in positive affect were more likely than those in neutral affect to choose a mail-in rebate for a larger amount of money over a smaller instant rebate, but only when the reward differences were moderate (not small). Two showed that positive-affect participants do not discount the value of delayed (versus immediate) outcomes as much as controls do (i.e., they show less "present bias"). And two studies examined possible cognitive processes involved in this effect.
[ to cite ]:
Jin Seok Pyone and Alice M. Isen (2010) ,"Positive Affect, Intertemporal Choice, and Levels of Thinking: Increasing Consumers’ Willingness to Wait", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 596-597 .