The Use of Hypocrisy to Motivate Health Attitude and Behavior Change

Jeff Stone, University of Arizona, USA
Nicholas C. Fernandez, University of Arizona, USA
When individuals do not practice health behaviors that they preach to others, their act of hypocrisy induces cognitive dissonance and the motivation to change their own health behavior. But how many past failures must hypocrites recall in order to feel dissonance? Using a self-validation framework, this study found that when elaboration about past failures to use sunscreen was low, more young adult hypocrites acquired sunscreen after recalling 8 compared to 2 past failures. However, when elaboration about past failures was high, more hypocrites acquired sunscreen after recalling 2 compared to 8 past failures. Mediators of this effect will be discussed.
[ to cite ]:
Jeff Stone and Nicholas C. Fernandez (2010) ,"The Use of Hypocrisy to Motivate Health Attitude and Behavior Change ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 138-142 .