Differences in Self-Regulatory Strength As a Function of Self-Construal

Ashley Rae Arsena, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA
Jaehoon Lee, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA
L.J. Shrum, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA
Yinlong Zhang, Joy L. Row, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA; University of Texas at San Antonio, USA
An experiment tested differences in self-regulation capacity as a function of self-construal (independent vs. interdependent). Research has shown that interdependents often exert more self-control than interdependents because of an increased motivation to behave in a socially appropriate way. We posited that chronic interdependents would perform better on a self-control task than would chronic independents, even after a self-regulatory resource depletion task, because of increased self-control capacity built up through frequent practice. We found that depleted interdependents took less chocolate than depleted independents, supporting our hypothesis that self-regulatory resources differ as a function of self-construal.
[ to cite ]:
Ashley Rae Arsena, Jaehoon Lee, L.J. Shrum, and Yinlong Zhang, Joy L. Row (2010) ,"Differences in Self-Regulatory Strength As a Function of Self-Construal ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 750-751 .