All Positive Emotions Are Not Equal: Cognitive and Motivational Differences Between Pride and Surprise

Julian Saint Clair, University of Washington, USA
Recent research has begun to explore differences between negative emotions. As for positive emotions, they have generally been lumped into a single homogeneous category when explored in relation to decision making. The study presented here is the first to demonstrate underlying cognitive and motivational differences between distinct positive emotions in the context of decision making. Due to emotional discounting, a recent effect hitherto demonstrated only with negative emotions, these effects are reversed for subjects with high need for cognition (NFC). Emotional discounting, in turn, is shown to be subject to a new boundary condition: self-esteem maintenance.
[ to cite ]:
Julian Saint Clair (2010) ,"All Positive Emotions Are Not Equal: Cognitive and Motivational Differences Between Pride and Surprise", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 896-898 .