Thinking Makes Me Hungry: Differences in Restrained and Unrestrained Eating Behaviors in a Rich Food Environment

Melissa Bublitz, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA
Lauren G. Block, Baruch College, CUNY, USA
Laura Peracchio, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA
Not all consumers respond to marketplace and product package cues in the same manner. Larger packages may prompt some consumers to eat more, while other consumers, restrained eaters who are more diet conscious, actually eat less (Scott et al. 2008). This paper explores how restrained and unrestrained eaters respond to their food environment. Specifically, we take an in-depth look at the role of cognitive processing as well as how the variety and assortment of healthy and unhealthy food choices impact the eating behaviors of restrained and unrestrained consumers.
[ to cite ]:
Melissa Bublitz, Lauren G. Block, and Laura Peracchio (2010) ,"Thinking Makes Me Hungry: Differences in Restrained and Unrestrained Eating Behaviors in a Rich Food Environment", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 761-762 .