How and When the Moral Self Motivates Donations of Time Versus Money

Americus Reed II, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Karl Aquino, University of British Columbia, Canada
Eric Levy, University of Washington, USA
Stephanie Finnel, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Moral identity, when either central or temporarily primed, has been found to increase preferences to hypothetically give time versus money. Two studies extend this past work. Study 1 identifies why moral identity increases preferences to give time versus money: activating moral identity leads to a desire to express that identity, and giving time is more expressive of moral identity than giving money. Study 2 explores how moral identity affects actual donations, showing that both internal (moral identity centrality) and external (moral identity priming) sources of moral motivation must be present for consumers to prefer donating real time versus real money.
[ to cite ]:
Americus Reed II, Karl Aquino, Eric Levy, and Stephanie Finnel (2010) ,"How and When the Moral Self Motivates Donations of Time Versus Money", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 134-137 .