Getting Past That First, Compelling Response: Three Behavioral Studies and an Fmri Investigation of Performance and Overconfidence on the Cognitive Reflection Test

Robert Spunt, University of California at Los Angeles, USA
Matthew Lieberman, University of California at Los Angeles, USA
The Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT; Frederick, 2005) features items that elicit incorrect ‘first responses’, and thus has been used as a measure of an individual’s tendency to resist reporting the first response that comes to mind when making a judgment or decision. We present evidence from several behavioral studies and an fMRI study suggesting that these ‘first responses’ are the product of a process of attribution substitution (Kahneman & Frederick, 2002), whereby an easily performed, heuristic operation (e.g., subtraction) is ‘substituted’ for a less easily performed set of target operations (e.g., algebra).
[ to cite ]:
Robert Spunt and Matthew Lieberman (2010) ,"Getting Past That First, Compelling Response: Three Behavioral Studies and an Fmri Investigation of Performance and Overconfidence on the Cognitive Reflection Test", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 111-114 .