When Do Personal Values Predict Helping Behaviors? It’S All in the Mindset

Andrew Kaikati, University of Minnesota, USA
Carlos Torelli, University of Minnesota, USA
This research attempts to reconcile mixed findings in the value-behavior literature. We posit that personal values of benevolence and universalism are more likely to influence charitable behaviors toward in-group members, out-group members, and the environment when people are in an abstract (vs. concrete) mindset. In three studies, we measure the importance of benevolence or universalism values and simultaneously manipulate accessible mindsets. We find that values are more likely to predict behavioral intentions (help a friend move; recycle a battery) and behaviors (sign up to volunteer) when people think abstractly (vs. concretely) about their actions.
[ to cite ]:
Andrew Kaikati and Carlos Torelli (2010) ,"When Do Personal Values Predict Helping Behaviors? It’S All in the Mindset", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 157-160 .