What Do These Clinical Trial Results Mean For Me? How Personally Relevant Decisions Are Affected By Data Framing, Partitioning, and Quantification

Dipayan Biswas, Bentley University, USA
Connie Pechmann, University of California at Irvine, USA
Data from clinical trials or tests are often presented in partitioned or aggregated formats, as successes or failures, and as frequencies or percentages. The authors study how consumers process such data to make personally relevant decisions. Prior studies found no framing bias given personal relevance. The results of four experiments indicate that partitioned frequency data undermines the ability to process and causes framing bias to emerge despite personal relevance. However, high data variance invalidates the frame as a heuristic cue, nullifying the bias. Also, judgments of efficacy probability align with actual efficacy only when partitioned, frequency data is success framed.
[ to cite ]:
Dipayan Biswas and Connie Pechmann (2010) ,"What Do These Clinical Trial Results Mean For Me? How Personally Relevant Decisions Are Affected By Data Framing, Partitioning, and Quantification", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 727-728 .