Decision Making on the Small Screen: Adaptive Behavior in Constrained Information Environments

Nicholas Lurie, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA
Doe-Hyun Song, Digital Solutions Inc., USA
Sridhar Narasimhan, Georgia Tech, USA
Two process-tracing studies and a Monte-Carlo simulation examine how display characteristics of small screens affect decision making processes and outcomes. Experimental results show that users of small screens acquire less information, are less selective in information acquisition, and are more likely to process by attribute than by alternative. Decision quality is reduced on smaller screens and displays that show more attributes than alternatives lead to better decisions, regardless of screen orientation. Simulation results show that differences in the effort required to make decisions on small screen devices are much smaller for non-compensatory than compensatory decision strategies.
[ to cite ]:
Nicholas Lurie, Doe-Hyun Song, and Sridhar Narasimhan (2010) ,"Decision Making on the Small Screen: Adaptive Behavior in Constrained Information Environments", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 459-460 .