The Impact of Implicit Theories on Family Brand Evaluations

Joseph Chang, Vancouver Island University, Canada
This paper examines the impact of implicit theories of personality (entity vs. incremental) on the evaluations of family brands. Based on the findings of lay theories, new brand extension information is expected to be more influential or diagnostic on family brand evaluations for incremental (vs. entity) theorists; entity (vs. incremental) theorists tend to perceive the entitativity of family brands higher and form on-line (vs. memory-based) impressions of family brands; the stereotyping and attribute transference (GLAT model) within family brands are more likely to occur to entity (vs. incremental) theorists; and information about family brands are more likely to be polarized by entity (vs. incremental) theorists.
[ to cite ]:
Joseph Chang (2010) ,"The Impact of Implicit Theories on Family Brand Evaluations", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 768-769 .