The “Name-Ease” Effect and Its Dual Impact on Importance Judgments

Aparna Labroo, University of Chicago, USA
Soraya Lambotte, University of Chicago, USA
Yan Zhang, University of Chicago, USA
We demonstrate that naming (vs. not naming) a finding elicits feelings of ease, which increase or decrease the finding’s perceived importance depending on whether people are assessing its understandability or memorability. When judging understandability, feelings of ease reduce the finding’s perceived importance. This is because people exert effort to understand important information, and so reversely infer that information requiring effort to understand is important. When judging memorability, feelings of ease enhance the finding’s perceived importance. This is because people recall important information more easily, equating ease with importance. Thus, merely naming a finding enhances or reduces its perceived importance depending on the inferences people make.
[ to cite ]:
Aparna Labroo, Soraya Lambotte, and Yan Zhang (2010) ,"The “Name-Ease” Effect and Its Dual Impact on Importance Judgments", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 37, eds. Margaret C. Campbell, Jeff Inman, and Rik Pieters, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 634-634 .