The Illusion of Avoiding Bias: How Correcting For Perceived Bias Can Make a Recommendation More Effective

Francine Espinoza, University of Maryland, USA
Rebecca Hamilton, University of Maryland, USA
This research shows that correcting for the influence of a product recommendation moderates source trustworthiness effects on behavioral intentions and can make a recommendation more effective. Study 1 shows that when consumers correct their judgments, differences in the effectiveness of recommendations from trusted and distrusted sources are eliminated. Study 2 suggests that the effect is mediated by the certainty with which consumers hold their judgments. Study 3 provides further support for the certainty explanation by replicating the effect when participants are subliminally primed with certainty and the source of recommendation is constant.
[ to cite ]:
Francine Espinoza and Rebecca Hamilton (2009) ,"The Illusion of Avoiding Bias: How Correcting For Perceived Bias Can Make a Recommendation More Effective", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 623-624.