The Effects of Nine-Ending Prices and the Need For Cognition in Price Cognition

Shih-Chieh Chuang, Chung Cheng University, Taiwan
Chaang-Yung Kung, Chao-yang University of Technology, Taiwan
Yin-Hui Cheng, National Penghu University, Taiwan
Shu-Li Yu, Chaoyang University of Technology, Taiwan
Research has suggested that prices that end in a nine are considered to be significantly lower than prices that are one cent higher. Building on previous research, this study investigates how the need for cognition (NFC) and cognitive effort affects the perception of nine-ending prices among consumers. The empirical results of two experiments demonstrate that consumers with a low NFC are more likely to perceive nine-ending prices to be lower than prices ending with a zero than are consumers with a high NFC.
[ to cite ]:
Shih-Chieh Chuang, Chaang-Yung Kung, Yin-Hui Cheng, and Shu-Li Yu (2009) ,"The Effects of Nine-Ending Prices and the Need For Cognition in Price Cognition", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 973-973.