Hot Stimuli and Arousal: Implications For Temporal Orientation, Trial and Price

Brittany Duff, University of Minnesota, USA
Ron Faber, University of Minnesota, USA
Recent studies have demonstrated the effects of appetitive stimuli on temporal orientation and consumption impatience. Arousal has been shown to matter at the stimulus level but posited to not matter at the individual level. However, it is argued here that initial arousal may be important. Results replicate prior findings for individuals high in initial arousal, but opposite results are obtained for those low in initial arousal. This study demonstrates that pre-exposure individual arousal levels interact with stimulus arousal with effects for delay discounting, trial and price.
[ to cite ]:
Brittany Duff and Ron Faber (2009) ,"Hot Stimuli and Arousal: Implications For Temporal Orientation, Trial and Price", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 994-994.