Too Much of a Good Thing: Insensitivity to Rate of Consumption Leads to Unintended Satiation

Jeff Galak, New York University, USA
Justin Kruger, New York University, USA
George Loewenstein, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Repetition of a well-liked stimulus—whether a tasty treat, catchy tune, or favorite piece of art—can cause satiation. This research suggests that rate of consumption moderates that tendency, but that consumers do not fully account for rate in either their predictions or behavior. Consequently, people consume too rapidly, growing tired of initially well-liked stimuli more quickly than if they spaced repetitions. Paradoxically, participants who chose their own (rapid) rate of consumption were less satisfied than those who had their rate of consumption decided for them.
[ to cite ]:
Jeff Galak, Justin Kruger, and George Loewenstein (2009) ,"Too Much of a Good Thing: Insensitivity to Rate of Consumption Leads to Unintended Satiation", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 56-59.