Why Coastal Dwellers May Prefer Tide: the Effects of Conceptually-Related Environmental Cues on Product Evaluation

Jonah Berger, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Grainne Fitzsimons, University of Waterloo, Canada
Little empirical research has examined the implicit effects of environmental cues on consumer behavior. Across four studies using a combination of field and laboratory methods, the authors find that products are more accessible and evaluated more favorably, when the surrounding environment contains more conceptually-related cues. More frequent exposure to conceptually-related cues increases product accessibility and makes the product easier to process. This conceptual fluency, in turn, influences product evaluation and purchase likelihood, which vary directly with the frequency of exposure to conceptually-related cues. These results illustrate that conceptual priming effects can have a strong impact on real-world consumer judgments.
[ to cite ]:
Jonah Berger and Grainne Fitzsimons (2009) ,"Why Coastal Dwellers May Prefer Tide: the Effects of Conceptually-Related Environmental Cues on Product Evaluation", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 168-171.