Is High-Caloric Food Consumption an Addictive Behavior in Our Modern World of Plenty? a Test of the Relationship Between Performance in a Neuropsychological Positive-Emotion Shifting Task and Everyday Snacking Behavior in Non-Obese Adult Women

Ji Lu, McGill University, Canada
Laurette Dube, McGill University, Canada
Antoine Bechara, University of Southern California
In order to examine the degree to which high caloric food (HCF) consumption conform to an addiction-like model, 132 non-obese adult women engaged in a two-phase study in which they first performed the affective shifting task (AST) and subsequently reported their HCF snacking behavior and craving in an experience sampling study. Individual indices for attentional and inhibitory performance were derived from the AST and served as predictors of the person’s snacking, craving, and the weight of craving carried in snacking. Results showed that a women’s inhibitory performance in AST could account for her everyday HCF snacking consumption.
[ to cite ]:
Ji Lu, Laurette Dube, and Antoine Bechara (2008) ,"Is High-Caloric Food Consumption an Addictive Behavior in Our Modern World of Plenty? a Test of the Relationship Between Performance in a Neuropsychological Positive-Emotion Shifting Task and Everyday Snacking Behavior in Non-Obese Adult Women", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 847-849.