The Robin Hoods of the Information Age: the Differential Effects of Financial and Time Expenditures on Sharing

Yuliya Komarova, University of South Carolina
Cait Poynor, University of South Carolina
The goal of this paper is to investigate how consumers justify engaging in unethical and often illegal sharing (e.g., sharing software). We posit that both, money spent acquiring a product and time spent on turning the product into a shareable commodity, influence consumers’ propensity to share. Moreover, we find that these effects are not additive. More specifically, our preliminary results suggest that consumers may be most likely to share, as well as experience a positive affective boost from sharing, when they spend more (vs. less) money on acquiring a product and a long (vs. short) time on making it shareable.
[ to cite ]:
Yuliya Komarova and Cait Poynor (2008) ,"The Robin Hoods of the Information Age: the Differential Effects of Financial and Time Expenditures on Sharing", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1023-1023.