Power and Donation: Does Perceived Power Decrease Or Increase Charitable Contribution?

Xianchi Dai, INSEAD, France
Anne Fries, University of Cologne, Germany
In the current paper we examine the effect of perceived power on charitable donations. We hypothesize that high power people are more self-centered, paying less attention to others, and focusing more on what pleases themselves. As a consequence, comparing to low power people, 1) they show less sympathy to suffering people, and thus donate less to them; 2) they allocate more donations to attractive rather than unattractive people. Across three studies, our hypotheses were supported. These results enrich our knowledge on the role of perceived power in helping behavior in particular and in decision making in general.
[ to cite ]:
Xianchi Dai and Anne Fries (2008) ,"Power and Donation: Does Perceived Power Decrease Or Increase Charitable Contribution?", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 984-985.