The Effect of Mood and Lay Theories of Emotion on Self Regulation

Aparna Labroo, University of Chicago
Anirban Mukhopadhyay, University of Michigan
Five studies demonstrate that people hold naive beliefs about the transience of emotion, which along with their current mood determine whether they make choices that reflect self-regulation or mood-regulation (e.g., dieters choose apple vs. chocolate). Feeling happy, people engage in self regulation if they believe that emotion is stable (vs. transient). In contrast, people feeling unhappy engage in self regulation if they believe that emotion is transient (vs. stable). These effects are obtained with measured and with manipulated beliefs; they occur only when the theories pertain specifically to emotion; and making the lay theories salient attenuates the effects, suggesting that the effects occur outside of conscious awareness.
[ to cite ]:
Aparna Labroo and Anirban Mukhopadhyay (2008) ,"The Effect of Mood and Lay Theories of Emotion on Self Regulation", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 133-137.