Culture and Mental Representations of Power Goals: Consequences For Information Processing

Carlos Torelli, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Sharon Shavitt, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
This research examines the link between people’s cultural values and the types of power goals they pursue, distinguishing between notions of power as status and power for the benefit of others. In three studies, we show that the distinction between horizontal (valuing equality) and vertical (emphasizing status) cultural orientations predicts how people process information when power is salient. Those who are relatively high in vertical-individualism engage in more stereotyping, presumably to preserve their power identity, whereas those who are relatively high in horizontal-collectivism engage in more individuating, presumably in order to form careful impressions that could be helpful to others.
[ to cite ]:
Carlos Torelli and Sharon Shavitt (2008) ,"Culture and Mental Representations of Power Goals: Consequences For Information Processing", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 194-197.