The Effect of Exposure to Narrow Versus Broad Categorizations on Subsequent Decision Making

Guelden Uelkuemen, University of Southern California
Vicki Morwitz, New York University
Amitav Chakravarti, New York University
Exposure to broad versus narrow categorizations in an initial task significantly alters consumers’ information processing styles, which in turn changes their categorizing and purchasing behavior in subsequent and unrelated tasks, ranging from basic cognitive behaviors (e.g., grouping), and consumer decisions (e.g., new product adoptions), to more general decision-making strategies (e.g., susceptibility to heuristics). Previous exposure to a broadly categorized context instigates a more lenient processing orientation and greater susceptibility to context effects and decision heuristics. In contrast, previous exposure to a narrowly categorized context instigates a careful processing orientation, leading to decisions that are invariable across contexts.
[ to cite ]:
Guelden Uelkuemen, Vicki Morwitz, and Amitav Chakravarti (2008) ,"The Effect of Exposure to Narrow Versus Broad Categorizations on Subsequent Decision Making", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 80-83.