Following Through on Decisions: the Costs and Benefits of Implemental Mindsets

Amy Dalton, Duke University
John Lynch, Duke University
Stephen Spiller, Duke University
This research explores two factors that influence the probability that individuals follow through on decisions once made. These factors are (1) whether or not individuals adopt an implemental mindset (i.e., a mindset focused on how, when, and where a decision will be implemented), and (2) the number of decisions furnished with an implemental mindset. Across laboratory and field studies, we find that an implemental mindset benefits individuals acting on a single decision, but not multiple decisions. This effect occurs because implemental mindsets actually weaken commitment when multiple decisions are to be acted on.
[ to cite ]:
Amy Dalton, John Lynch, and Stephen Spiller (2008) ,"Following Through on Decisions: the Costs and Benefits of Implemental Mindsets", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 101-105.