When Does the Past Repeat Itself? the Role of Behavior Prediction and Personal Norms

Pierre Chandon, INSEAD, France
Vicki Morwitz, New York University
Ronn Smith, University of Arkansas
Eric R. Spangenberg, David E. Sprott, Washington State University, Washington State University
Although we know that many behaviors are repeated, we know little about what influences the strength and likelihood of behavior repetition. Two laboratory studies and two field studies investigate how behavior prediction and personal norms interact to influence whether or not people repeat their past behavior. We find that asking people about their future behavior increases their likelihood of repeating past behaviors when personal norms are weak but reduces it when personal norms are strong. By identifying a new consequence of asking question about future behavior (behavior repetition) and a new moderator (personal norm strength), our results contribute to the debate regarding the relative importance of habits and intentions in guiding behavior and reconcile some seemingly contradictory past findings in mere-measurement and self-prophecy research.
[ to cite ]:
Pierre Chandon, Vicki Morwitz, Ronn Smith, and Eric R. Spangenberg, David E. Sprott (2008) ,"When Does the Past Repeat Itself? the Role of Behavior Prediction and Personal Norms", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 125-128.