Persuasion Pleasure and Selling Stress: the Role of Non-Verbal Communication in Consumer Influence Settings

Bob M. Fennis, University of Twente, The Netherlands
Four studies tested the notion that predictable patterns of nonverbal behavior on the part of a persuasion agent emerge in dyadic influence settings that subsequently affect the persuasive outcome of the interaction. More specifically, Study 1 showed that an agent aiming to persuade a skeptical and resisting consumer, will exhibit nonverbal behavior associated with anticipated failure. Conversely, Study 2 demonstrated that attempting to persuade a positive and supportive consumer, induces cues associated with anticipated success, mediated by emotions. Studies 3 and 4 confirmed that both nonverbal communication patterns affected consumer compliance with both commercial and non-profit sales-requests.
[ to cite ]:
Bob M. Fennis (2008) ,"Persuasion Pleasure and Selling Stress: the Role of Non-Verbal Communication in Consumer Influence Settings", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 797-798.