Avoiding the Debt Trap: How Attributional Retraining Can Influence Consumers’ Perceived Control Over and Behavioural Intentions Towards Debt

Kelley Main, University of Manitoba, Canada
Mei-Ling Wei, Ryerson University, Canada
Eileen Fischer, York University, Canada
This paper addresses a pressing need to identify factors that may reduce individuals’ propensity to accumulate debt. Across three experimental studies, the paper shows that attributional retraining can affect both attributions of control regarding debt accumulation and intentions to incur debt; that more credible sources are not necessarily more effective in delivering attributional retraining messages; and that the perceived motive of a source moderates the impact of source credibility on effectiveness of delivering attributional retraining messages.
[ to cite ]:
Kelley Main, Mei-Ling Wei, and Eileen Fischer (2008) ,"Avoiding the Debt Trap: How Attributional Retraining Can Influence Consumers’ Perceived Control Over and Behavioural Intentions Towards Debt", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 654-655.