All Charity Advertisements Are Not Created Equal: Influences of Message Framing, Vividness Valence, and Number Size Framing

Chun-Tuan Chang, National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan
Yu-Kang Lee, National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan
This research tests the idea that responses to charitable appeals could be influenced by message framing and presentations of vivid pictures and stories, and determines whether different statistical information described in a message would modify framing effects. Child poverty, a pressing social policy issue of the 21st century in the US and elsewhere, is adopted as a charitable context in the present study. Results of the experiments indicate that vividness valence enhances framing effects on advertising effectiveness when vivid elements (i.e., photographs or stories) to the framed message are congruent, especially when both are presented negatively. A three-way interaction of message framing, vividness valence, and number size framing is observed. When the donation message is framed negatively with the negative vivid presentation, statistics with a small number size arouse stronger behavioral intention to donate than those with a large one. Nevertheless, when the positively framed message is accompanied by the positive vivid presentation, opposite results are obtained.
[ to cite ]:
Chun-Tuan Chang and Yu-Kang Lee (2008) ,"All Charity Advertisements Are Not Created Equal: Influences of Message Framing, Vividness Valence, and Number Size Framing", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 652-653.